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Economy

Augusta is a regional center of medicine, biotechnology, and military. Georgia Health Sciences University, the state's only public health sciences graduate university, employs over 7,000 people. Along with University Hospital, the Medical District of Augusta employs over 25,000 people and has an economic impact of over $1.8 billion.[15] Along with Georgia Health Sciences University, the city's three largest employers include the Savannah River Site (a Department of Energy nuclear facility) and the U.S. Army Signal Center at Fort Gordon. Despite layoffs from several companies during the U.S. economic recession and a relatively high state unemployment rate,[16] the Augusta Community has experienced a decrease in bankruptcy filings[17] and saw a slight decrease in the unemployment rate from late 2009 to March 2011. However, these unemployment numbers are misleading as Spring brings lower unemployment rates due to the Augusta Masters. While unemployment fell to a two year low of 8.3% in April 2011, unemployment rates have since risen back to 9.9% as of July 2011. [18] Companies that have facilities, headquarters or distribution centers in Augusta include CareSouth, T-Mobile, Solo Cup Company, Automatic Data Processing, International Paper, NutraSweet, Teleperformance, Sitel Corporation, E-Z-GO, Elanco, Club Car (Worldwide Headquarters), John Deere, Procter & Gamble, Kellogg's and Delta Air Lines baggage call center. Biotechnology or biotech is the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make useful products, or "any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use" (UN Convention on Biological Diversity).[ ] For thousands of years, humankind has used biotechnology in agriculture, food production and medicine.[2] The term itself is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 by Hungarian engineer Karl Ereky. In the late 20th and early 21st century, biotechnology has expanded to include new and diverse sciences such as genomics, recombinant gene technologies, applied immunology, and development of pharmaceutical therapies and diagnostic tests. Medicine (i/?m?ds?n/, i/?m?d?s?n/) is the applied science or practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.[1] It encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness in human beings. Contemporary medicine applies health science, biomedical research, and medical technology to diagnose and treat injury and disease, typically through medication or surgery, but also through therapies as diverse as psychotherapy, external splints & traction, prostheses, biologics, ionizing radiation and others. The word medicine is derived from the Latin ars medicina, meaning the art of healing. A military is an organization authorized by its greater society to use lethal force, usually including use of weapons, in defending its country by combating actual or perceived threats. The military may have additional functions of use to its greater society, such as advancing a political agenda e.g. military junta, supporting or promoting economic expansion through imperialism, and as a form of internal social control. As an adjective the term "military" is also used to refer to any property or aspect of a military. Militaries often function as societies within societies, by having their own military communities.

All content © 2013, Triad Publications, LLC
Updated in February 2013